ACRL 2013: Entry-Level Jobs, Professional Develpment & E-Book DDA

  • Where Have All the Entry-Level Positions Gone? An Analysis of Shifting Expectations for New Librarians Entering Professional Practice
  • Finding inspiration from within: Harnessing your library’s knowledge for professional development programming
  • Identifying Users of Demand-Driven E-book Programs: Applications for Collection Development

Where Have All the Entry-Level Positions Gone? An Analysis of Shifting Expectations for New Librarians Entering Professional Practice
Katherine Schilling, Indiana University (Indianapolis) , Indianapolis , IN
Olivia Hedlund , IUPUI , Indianapolis , IN

Fewer entry-level positions – most requiring professional experience? Got a master’s but I’m still not qualified. Why?

Looked at jobs requiring MLS or equiv from 90 95 00 05 10 11

All MLS jobs down 86% since 1990. For every one job in 2011 there were 7.3 in 1990. Large drop off from 2000 to 2005. 3000+ in 2000 358 in 2005.

Entry level were down 88% since 1990. For every 1 job in 2011 there were 8.5 in 1990. Managerial down 64% since 199 – for every 1 in 2011, 2.8 in 1990

Today – 6x as many managerial jobs as entry level. 2x as many “leadership experience” positions as there were entry-level. 46% of the jobs that wanted leadership experience at entry level positions.

Managerial – head lib, dept heads. Leadership – any position for anywhere with a specification for “previous leadership experience”

Lots of institutions are hiring from within, not replacing the entry level positions. We’re top-heavy – is this sustainable? How do we socialize the new professionals into the field? Where can they go to get experience? OK to go outside the field? Should they have to?

Mentoring and internships to better prepare students from the get-go.

Maybe jobs are being posted elsewhere? Looked at American Libs and MLA News.

 

Finding inspiration from within: Harnessing your library’s knowledge for professional development programming
Carissa Tomlinson , Towson University- Albert S. Cook Library , Towson , MD

Internal professional development and why it’s important. Cook’s Teach Around. Not staff training or even development. Kind of thing you see at conferences.

Why is there a need for internal prof dev? These days there’s a vast assortment of skills needed. In the 60s we were more similarly skilled – reference skills were pretty standard, for example.

How stay current when it’s so varied? Peer learning – “reciprocal helping relationships” – no designated trainer, all are teaching one another and learning from one another. Encourages intergenerational learning and cross-functional sharing. Also facilitates transfer of institutional memory, organizational culture and other tacit knowledge.

What does this actually look like? Workshops, seminars, journal clubs, online, in person, both.  Make sure it’s a peer-learning model, not a designated trainer.

Teach Around @ Cook Library

50 librarians, variety of generations, lots of newer/younger librarians. Liaison model with departments and other offices.

Teach Arounds held 2-3 times a semester and monthly in the summer. Topics generated by everyone – suggest things for other people or yourself to talk about.

Most people find it valuable for reference and instruction skills. All agree that it promotes a collegial environment and helps reinforce that everyone has valuable skills.

Q&A: circ staff and paraprofessionals? Teach around is specific to librarians – all librarians.  No problem with parapros coming or presenting – but we are tenure track faculty, so our role is different. There’s more general staff development going on for everyone in the library.
Identifying Users of Demand-Driven E-book Programs: Applications for Collection Development
Emily Chan , San Jose State University , San Jose , CA
Susan Kendall , San Jose State University , San Jose , CA

1 million volumes – 100,000+ in e-formats. Traditional collection development procedures – requests, standing orders, approval plans, liaisons selecting.

PDA model empowers the user to select what they need at the time – selected from a pool that librarians have already vetted. Need to have something that would authenticate authorized users, went with EBL. (They call it Demand Driven Acquisition)

EBL gave the option to collect some user information – Fac/Staff/Grad/Undergrad and discipline of study. 52% undergrads, 32% grads, 13% faculty 2% staff.  Lots of books were being selected outside of the user’s identified subject area, particularly for undergrads. Theorize they were using them for general education classes (pleased by this).

Should we continue this when there’s not as much instruction? Jan/Summer. Could be a time to support fac when doing research…but not much use. But offer it anyway.

Compared circ of print and e from DDA – overall more e use. Exceptions history, lit, etc.

Q&A: average uses for DDA items – 4.4 circs. 2 for print collection.

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