2020 Reads: January & February

January

  • An Ocean of Minutes, Thea Lim: Time travel + post catastrophe novel, A+ combination.
  • Here and Now and Then, Mike Chen: More time travel. Slightly predictable plus but really interesting concept driving it.
  • Ninth House, Leigh Bardugo: This is what might happen if you though frats were toxic, and set The Secret History at an Ivy League where all the students had gone to Hogwarts.
  • Everything I Never Told You, Celeste Ng (audiobook narrated by Cassandra Campbell): What happens when your parents can’t see who you really are.
  • Wanderers, Chuck Wending: This and Severance are what you should be reading right now if you’re into horror.

February

October 2019 in Books

Didn’t finish much this month thanks to a cold and some late nights.

  • A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World, C.A. Fletcher: A post-apocalypse book that doesn’t really look much at all at the catastrophe. I really enjoyed the POV of this one.
  • The Testaments, Margaret Atwood: A glimpse into the inner workings of Gilead.
  • The Luminous Dead, Caitlin Starling: A sci-fi novel where the sci-fi part just is. Ultimately this is a psychological thriller about caving and extreme solitude.

If you only read one, it’s a tossup between A Boy and His Dog at the End of the World and The Luminous Dead.

April 2019 in Books

An Unkindness of Ghosts, River Solomon: A story set in space that’s mostly about the societal structure of the ship where the story takes place, which is very much like the antebellum South. Intense.

84K, Claire North: The Company controls everything, including the government. Interesting writing & structure.

Transcription, Kate Atkinson: A WWII story with spillover effects later in the main character’s life. Not enough time spent on the ending.

The Calculating Stars, Mary Robinette Kowal: Disaster strikes, the space race heats up, and some women try to become astronauts in the 1950s. I really want to see this made into a miniseries.

Bitter Orange, Claire Fuller: Slow-burning story of two women who are both trying to escape their past.

Unfinished: Melmoth, Sarah Perry.

If you only read one, make it either 84K or Transcription.

February 2019 in Books

    • Snap, Belinda Bauer: This is a backwards mystery – you pretty quickly learn who the culprit is, most of the story is about collecting the evidence.
    • The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet, Becky Chambers: Reminded me of Firefly, get on it! This was a really fun read.
    • Convenience Store Woman, Sayaka Murata, Ginny Tapley Takemori (Translator): Quick and quirky. If you’re not sure about it, Longreads has a big excerpt.
    • City of Thieves, David Benioff: Character-driven and really well-written.
    • How to Get Dressed, Alison Freer: There were a lot of tips in this that were not new to me, but it was easy to skim and I think would be a great resource for anyone who wants to dress better, but isn’t quite sure how to make their wardrobe do that for them.
    • The Lowland, Jhumpa Lahiri: Beautifully, beautifully written. “Lyrical” does not feel overblown here.
    • Welcome to the Goddamn Ice Cube, Blair Braverman: For some reason, I thought this book was about something else. Still enjoyed it though!
    • The Silence of the Girls, Pat Barker: You have to read this. I can’t wait to discuss with book club in a couple of days.
    • The Water Cure, Sophie Mackintosh: Fascinating. Lots of things aren’t explained, but some things are just inexplicable.

If you only read one from this list, it’s a toss-up between The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet and The Silence of the Girls.

January 2019 in Books

  • Paper Girls, Vol. 1, Brian K. Vaughan, Cliff Chiang (Illustrator), Matthew Wilson (Colorist), Jared K. Fletcher (Lettering): This was great, I immediately picked up the other volumes available.
  • Word by Word, Kory Stamper: Have you ever wondered who writes dictionary entries? No? Read this anyway.
  • What Is Not Yours Is Not Yours, Helen Oyeyemi: Short stories where the characters from the first turn up here and there in the rest.
  • The Mermaid and Mrs. Hancock, Imogen Hermes Gowar: I found most of the story in the last third of the book.
  • The Dreamers, Karen Thompson Walker: Super compelling undercover sci-fi. Beautifully written.
  • The Forgotten Hours, Katrin Schumann: The protagonist finds she needs to unravel a trauma from her past before she can move forward into the rest of her life.
  • Hey, Kiddo, Jarret. J. Krocoszka: That feeling when you are suddenly reading something that’s set where & when you grew up. Lovely illustrations & collages.
  • Future Home of the Living God, Louise Erdrich: Unspecified apocalyptic disaster. Echoes of The Handmaid’s Tale so brace yourself.
  • Snap, Belinda Bauer: Character-driven with a dash of police procedural.

This Summer in Books

Sometimes I wonder why I still have a blog. Anyway, still working on the Read Harder Challenge and also trying to get to more new releases more quickly. I’m aiming for about 3 months after publication, and while I haven’t quite made my self-imposed limit I have read a few things within a few months of publication, which is unusual for me.

Also, guess which month I didn’t travel.

May

June

July

August